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Munir’s Story – 28 years after the massacre at Sabra-Shatila”

Munir’s Story – 28 years after the massacre at Sabra-Shatila”

by Franklin Lamb -  September 2010

Introduction:

No – don’t skip this story thinking you have read all you care to read about Sabra-Shatila.  Not in your lifetime could you read enough to understand the full import of this savage inhumanity. 

Every single person killed had meaning, had family, had memories and had life until it was snuffed out by those whose lives never resonated in harmonious vibration with life’s longing for itself.  Somehow, somewhere, they lost or traded their souls for hatred, lust, blood, thrills – who knows what strips us back to naked barbarity. 

But of this I am sure – none would live free of torment today – the nightmares, the shaking, the sweats, the searing flashes of memory that will never bring a single moment of peace for the crimes committed in three days of vicious frenzy and twenty-eight years since of running from justice.  There is no hiding from truth or justice.  

One day the snarling dogs these tormentors unleashed will turn on them and nothing then will save the warmongers or those that cheered them on. And those who thought to turn the page just now, read and be ashamed that today the world is still mute on the humiliations, horrors and massacres that have been and are being perpetrated against the Palestinian people with wanton impunity.

The untreated psychic wounds are still open. Accountability, justice and basic civil rights for the survivors are still denied.

Scores of horror testimonies have been shared over the past nearly three decades by survivors of the September 1982 Sabra- Shatila massacre. More come to light only through circumstantial evidence because would-be affiants perished during the slaughter. Other eyewitness are just beginning to emerge from deep trauma or self-imposed silence.

Some testimonies will be shared this month by massacre survivors at Shatila camp. They will sit with the growing numbers of international visitors who annually come to commemorate one of the most horrific crimes of the 20th century.